Kamis, September 29, 2011
IFLA AWARDS-2nd Place: Vibrant Land

VIBRANT LAND

Title :Vibrant Land - shifting (urban) boundaries in Coastal North Carolina
Award : IFLA Zvi Miller Prize
Authors : Jorrit Noordhuizen, Inge Kersten
University : Wageningen University
Department : Chairgroup Landscape Architecture
Country : the Netherlands

This project deals with the dynamic landscape of the barrier island coast of North Carolina. The urban area at the shoreline clashes with the natural flows of the landscape, resulting in a landscape of loss and destruction, so that natural boundary areas between urban and rural have almost completely disappeared. The project shows that in order to transform this landscape into a sustainable and attractive environment, it is necessary to enable natural and human flows to interact. The dune landscape is rebuilt, and a new public space typology is introduced that engages natural and human flows, utilizing most notably a simple designed wooden structure that has great versatility of use.

This project succeeds in proposing landscape to live in, rather than landscape to simply be consumed. It emphasises the process of remaking a more sustainable landscape for living, and a more attractive landscape for experiencing, notably considering this throughout the seasons. The use of the wooden structural element is variously concealed and revealed, resulting in subtle and variable landforms. The project includes the interesting notion of using sand, an element that is constantly shifting, but that is anchored around one element. Playful and functional at the same time. Graphics were very convincing and clear.


(Courtesy by: http://www.hsr.ch/IFLA.7109.0.html )

Explanatory text
VIBRANT LAND – shifting (urban) boundaries in Coastal North Carolina


One of the most dynamic coastal landscapes in the World is the barrier island coast of North Carolina (the Outerbanks). Its shape and location change on a daily base, orchestrated by the dynamics of the sea (natural flows). The attractiveness of the coastal landscape seems to be an important pull-factor for seasonal occupation, urban settlement and expansion (human flows). However, the space consuming urban fabric (example area; Hayman Boulevard, Kitty Hawk, NC) clashes with the natural flows of the landscape, resulting in a landscape of loss and destruction. Natural boundary areas between urban and rural almost completely disappeared.


Man clearly has lost connection with the dynamics of nature. We show that in order to transform this landscape into a sustainable and attractive environment, it is necessary to enable natural and human flows to interact. The urban fabric turned out to be a symbol of standardized and uniform values with little spatial variation. In order to be able to propose and implement a process of transformation, it is important to enable people to relate to the measures that are proposed.

A start for transformation lies within the ‘voids’ in the landscape that can gradually absorb the natural flows. The ‘early wins’ lie in rebuilding the (dune) landscape by reactivating these voids, providing chances for new atmospheres and shelters for man and nature. Key in this transformation process is a new public space typology that engages natural and human flows.

A structure that is a fundamental element for rebuilding the dune morphology (natural flows, winter), that enables people to add their own program to it (temporal use, summer) and allows people to respond actively to the uncertainties of natural flows. The structure is build up from several simple wooden segments and can change its shape according to functional needs. Through its accessible scale and high performance effect this structure engages natural and human flows in a changing landscape.

(source: http://www.hsr.ch/IFLA.7109.0.html )





 
posted by JOHN F.PAPILAYA at 21.31 | Permalink |


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